What Scope Levels Are Available for Dimensions and Metrics: Google Analytics

what scope levels available for dimensions and metrics

Google Analytics is a powerful tool that can help you track your website’s traffic and understand your audience. But if you’re new to Google Analytics, all the different terms and options can be overwhelming. In this article, we’ll explain what scope levels are available for dimensions and metrics in Google Analytics.

What Is the Difference Between a Dimension and a Metric in GA?

Before learning what scope levels are available for dimensions and metrics, it’s important to understand the difference between the two.

In Google Analytics, dimensions are used to describe data, while metrics are used to measure data. For example, a dimension might be the ‘Page URL’ of a single hit, while a metric would be the ‘Total Pageviews’ for that URL. Generally speaking, dimensions provide context for metrics, and help to enhance our understanding of them.

However, it’s important to note that not all metrics need to be associated with a dimension – an example of this would be the ‘Users’ metric, which simply measures the number of unique visits to a website. Although it doesn’t provide any contextual information, it can still be extremely valuable in understanding website traffic. To become certified in Google Analytics, it is essential to have a good understanding of both dimensions and metrics.

What Scope Levels Are Available for Dimensions and Metrics?

In Google Analytics, dimensions and metrics can have one of three possible scope levels:

  • Hit-level: This means the dimension or metric applies to a single interaction (or hit) on a website. An example of this would be the ‘Page URL’ dimension, which describes the specific page that a user is viewing at any given moment.
  • Session-level: This means the dimension or metric applies to a single session on a website. An example of this would be the ‘Device Category’ dimension, which describes the type of device that was used during a specific session (e.g. desktop, mobile, tablet).
  • Product-level: This means the dimension or metric applies to a specific product in an ecommerce setting. An example of this would be the ‘Product Name’ dimension, which tells us the name of a specific product that was viewed or purchased during a session.
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What Is a User-Level Scope in Google Analytics?

While learning what scope levels are available for dimensions and metrics, it’s important to note that there is also a fourth scope level, known as ‘user-level.’ This means the dimension or metric applies to a specific user.

However, in order to use this scope level, you must have set up User-ID tracking in your Google Analytics account. Without it, all dimensions and metrics will default to session-level scope. Knowing what scope levels are available for dimensions and metrics in Google Analytics can help you make better sense of your website’s data and understand how to interpret it effectively. By understanding the differences between each scope level, you can more accurately analyze and report on the performance of your website.

What to Remember About Custom Dimensions and Custom Metrics?

Now that you know what scope levels are available for dimensions and metrics in Google Analytics, it’s also important to note that you can create your own custom dimensions and metrics. These can be particularly useful for tracking specific events or actions on your website that may not be included in the default options.

However, there are a few things to keep in mind when creating custom dimensions and metrics:

  • each custom dimension and custom metric can only be used once per reporting view (unless you create a calculated metric);
  • custom dimensions and custom metrics have a higher priority than the default options, so make sure to use them carefully and avoid any potential conflicts;
  • it is not possible to share or export custom dimensions and custom metrics across different Google Analytics accounts.
See also:  What Is a Dimension in Google Analytics? Custom Dimensions & Metrics

By understanding the limitations and proper usage of custom dimensions and custom metrics, you can make the most out of these powerful features in Google Analytics.

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