What Is Not Considered a “Source” in Google Analytics by Default?

Google Analytics is a useful tool (especially for SEO) that contains the answers to questions about your traffic sources. Today, we will be taking a look at the Source/Medium dimension – what they are exactly, and what is not considered a “source” in Google Analytics by default. Read on!
What Is Not Considered a "Source" in Google Analytics by Default

What Are “Source” and “Medium” in Google Analytics?

Before we dive in and tell you what is not considered a “source” in Google Analytics by default, let’s take a look at what exactly a source is.

If you’ve ever looked at your Google Analytics data, you may have noticed that there are two columns labeled “Source” and “Medium.” But what do these terms mean? Put simply, the “Source” tells you the origin of the traffic for your website or content is coming from, while the “Medium” tells you how they’re getting there. Some common sources are domains, social traffic, and search engines. Medium includes categories like organic search, paid search, and web referral.

For example, if someone clicks on a link to your site from a blog post, the source would be the blog (e.g., www.example.com) and the medium would be “referral traffic.” Likewise, if a visitor types your URL directly into their search engine, the source would be “(direct)” and the medium would be “none.”

What Is Not Considered a “Source” in Google Analytics by Default?

What is not considered a “source” in Google Analytics by default? While there are many things that are considered a “source” in Google Analytics, email is not one of them. This is because email is not tracked by default in Google Analytics. This means that you will need to set up tracking for email separately if you want to include it in your reports. 

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How to Set Email as a “Source” in Google Analytics

Many people who use Google Analytics to track their website traffic may not be aware that they can also track email clicks as a source of traffic. To do this, simply add “email” as a source in the “All Traffic” section of the Google Analytics dashboard. You will also need to add the trackable URL you’ll be sharing via email. Once you have done this, you will be able to see how many people are clicking on links in your emails and how these clicks compare to other sources of traffic. 

Why Should You Add Emails to Your Google Analytics Sources?

Now that we know what is not considered a “source” in Google Analytics by default, let’s see why it would be beneficial. Tracking emails in Google Analytics is essential because it helps the user grow their business by identifying which visits are coming from email campaigns. Additionally, tracking emails can help users discover and troubleshoot any issues with their email campaigns.

By understanding how well their emails are working, businesses can make changes to improve user experience and increase conversion rates. It’s extremely crucial for digital marketing campaigns. Ultimately, tracking emails in Google Analytics is an essential tool for any business that wants to grow its online presence.



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